Society

Finding Women in Naadam’s Manly Sports

As Mongolian society changes and adapts in a globally connected world, Naadam also takes on varying implications and raises several questions, including, what should we keep as part of our social identity and what should change?

Society and Culture

How Sinophobia and Excessive Nationalism Screws Us All in the End, Especially Women

Sinophobia - literally, the fear or hatred of China and Chinese people - is common within Mongolian culture. Even the more liberal-minded aunts, uncles, grannies and grandpas will tell you: “You can marry whoever you want, just not a Chinese.” Sinophobia seems to be deeply ingrained into Mongolian culture, with some citing centuries of ill-will. Others also cite a radical difference between the two cultures, often with the best qualities falling on home turf and the worst qualities in enemy territory. But why? Why is Sinophobia such a big deal in Mongolia? We’ll explore this idea for the next weeks, starting with Sinophobia and its effect on Mongolian women.  

Society and Culture

Is Mongolia an Inclusive Society?

Despite having grown up in America, I love being in Mongolia, the country of my birth and my childhood. I love the crisp, cold mornings, and the perfect tinge of blue overhead. I love the architecture and the downtown, a blend of history and modernity. I love hearing Mongolian being spoken around me. I love the steam of freshly cooked buuz, the sizzle of huushuur and the savory smell of suutai tsai. But most of all, I love the feeling I get – the feeling of finally coming home, the feeling of being so totally accepted and fitting in.